Nasjaja Hatali of the Navaho

Nesjaja Hatali - Navaho

For as long as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by the photography of Edward S. Curtis.

His photography of the American West, and of Native American peoples was absolutely extraordinary.

In particular, I love how he used light to capture the most intense expressions in people.  Lighting, as all photographers know, is everything.  It differentiates a good image from something magical.

I recently discovered a source of Curtis’ photographs, which have now outside of copyright, so I decided to restore and enhance the image you see above.

I know it’s been done before, but I’m considering compiling a book of Curtis’ images, once I’ve restored them.  If I go ahead with the project, I’d like to include significant information relating to the people in the images, to tell a story, as well as immortalize them through their images.

Just a thought for today!

The image below is the original image, included for comparison.

Nesjaja Hatali - Navaho v2

The Wright Flyer

Wright Brothers 2

Because of my love and passion for flying, the photo I restored today has an extra-special significance to me.

Wright Brothers 1

It depicts Wilbur Wright in the Wright Flyer, on the ground after an unsuccessful trail on December 14, 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.  It was only a few days later that man achieved sustained powered, heaver-than-air flight for the first time in recorded history.

This achievement has changed all of our lives in so many ways.  Even if you’re not a fan of flying, flight affects us each on a daily basis – goods are shipped across the world overnight through air freight; we can easily travel from one side of the world to the other in 24 hours or less; and the world has become smaller as a result.

I’d like to end this post by leaving you with my favorite quote (often attributed to Leonardo da Vinci) which perfectly sums up how I feel about flying:

“When once you have tasted flight,
you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward,
for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”